NOTEBOOK FEATURE

James Salter author photo

Things American: Writers Remember James Salter

American novelist, story writer, and screenwriter James Salter died on June 19th, leaving behind a body of work that presents a vision of a century in dramatic motion. He was a writer of the quotidian and a craftsman of the first water whose interest in sensory experiences is most evident in his arresting narrative passages. Food, drink, sex, the seemingly impossible beauty of things touched, witnessed, and heard—these are rendered in precise and yet often surprising terms in Salter’s work. In similar fashion, his dialogue—sometimes so lean in its construction as to risk sparseness—is crisp and at times biting, the words spoken by characters belying deeper motives or beliefs. Either ability—to craft such trenchant narration or to hear and replicate spoken language so shrewdly—is a remarkable and rare writerly gift. Noting here that Salter was possessed of them both seems an understatement. [ . . . ]

James Salter author photo

Things American: Writers Remember James Salter

American novelist, story writer, and screenwriter James Salter died on June 19th, leaving behind a body of work that presents a vision of a century in dramatic motion. He was a writer of the quotidian and a craftsman of the first water whose interest in sensory experiences is most evident in his arresting narrative passages. Food, drink, sex, the seemingly impossible beauty of things touched, witnessed, and heard—these are rendered in precise and yet often surprising terms in Salter’s work. In similar fashion, his dialogue—sometimes so lean in its construction as to risk sparseness—is crisp and at times biting, the words spoken by characters belying deeper motives or beliefs. Either ability—to craft such trenchant narration or to hear and replicate spoken language so shrewdly—is a remarkable and rare writerly gift. Noting here that Salter was possessed of them both seems an understatement. [ . . . ]

Leichter_SQUARE

Online Fiction Interview: Hilary Leichter

Hilary Leichter’s “The Statue of Limitations” plays by its own delightful set of rules. It’s at once the story of a couple imprisoned in their own home (a statue marking the furthest that they can roam into their yard without the “risk of pursuit”) and a parable for how intimacy ebbs and flows in a relationship. [...]

metropolis-robot-resSQUARE

Listen to our Web Exclusive Stories Read by the Authors

Since January, we’ve been working on a little project that we hope expands the reach of our web exclusive stories and that gives you, our readers, website visitors, subscribers, supporters and pals, a new way to engage with the fiction we publish.

ElizabethMcCracken_439234a

Now closed: the American Short Fiction Contest

The deadline to submit to our American Short Fiction Contest was JULY 1. The contest is now closed—our thanks to all who submitted! We look forward to announcing the winners, chosen by judge Elizabeth McCracken, soon.

ASF READS